Friday, January 29, 2010

Perspectives: Katie

This interview is between my cousin Katie and me. We are extremely close, so much so, that we are practically sisters. I thought her thoughts would offer an honest perspective on being close to someone with a disability.

Ann: What do you think of when you hear the term Cerebral Palsy?
Katie: I think of you because you are the only person I am close to who has Cerebral Palsy. I think of you as having the same mental capacity, but not the same physical capacity.

Ann: What is the most respectful term to use to describe someone who has Cerebral Palsy?
Katie: I just say that someone has Cerebral Palsy. I say someone has a disability because I know, firsthand, how people are sensitive because of you.

Ann: What do you think of using the term differently-abled to describe someone who has a physical disability?
Katie: I've never heard that term used before. I think it's okay if it doesn't insult someone, but if it does you shouldn't use it?

Ann: Have you ever seen me treated differently in public because of my disability?
Katie: No, but I've seen little kids and people stare.

Ann: What do you think is the typical stereotype for someone with a physical disability?
Katie: This is a deep one. I think that (i don't think necessarily) it is that they are not able to do things as quickly, or at all. This stereotype may carry over into people's perceptions of that person, thinking they may not be able to do things mentally as well, which is not true at all.

Ann: What do you think of the media's perceptions of disabilities?
Katie: The first thing I think of is Glee. They try to make the shows diverse. i don't think they necessarily look down on people with disabilities.

7 comments:

cerebral palsy said...

Dear Ann

There is a new CP website www.CerebralPalsySocial.org and I suspect you will probably want to know about it. It’s for people who cope with cerebral palsy directly or indirectly, on a daily basis.

So what can I say about it. It pays to have a look because you’ll see we’ve taken our first steps and now want to increase membership to make it more useful for all who use it.

You are invited to open a blog, use the bookmark function, start polling, open a group or join an existing group, connect your Twitter or FriendFeed to your profile, and the options are growing all the time. Most of all, you can stay in touch with your friends and make new ones!

So, stay well and stay in touch.

The CerebralPalsySocial.org team

Health Pain said...

We found that there are many legit foreign pharmacies that provide for safe and reliable medications at much lower prices. The idea that only US pharmacies can provide quality medications is obviously shallow. Foreign internet pharmacies will also often offer their patients a free online consultation. It would not be hard for authorities to recommend the use of such pharmacies to patients in need, but instead the DEA insist that the consumers’ safety is at stake when ordering at foreign pharmacies, since the safety can be compromised due to falsification and adulteration of the pharmaceutical products available in other countries.

Kim said...

The problem of chronic pain can be controlled in various ways, one of them is based medicines like Vicodin, Lortab, hydrocodone, which are drugs that are specific to this treatment, and doctors say that they are effective but if nothing is anxiolytic appropriately, further states that can cause dependence findrxonline as indicated in his article on drugs and consequences ..

Kim said...

The problem of chronic pain can be controlled in various ways, one of them is based medicines like Vicodin, Lortab, hydrocodone, which are drugs that are specific to this treatment, and doctors say that they are effective but if nothing is anxiolytic appropriately, further states that can cause dependence findrxonline as indicated in his article on drugs and consequences ..

Jeffrey said...

It is unfortunate that we can not do anything against chronic diseases such as cancer, AIDS, arthritis, etc. We just want to tell friend is to be strong and that these moments of pain we have to assimilate knowledge, God rest his soul ...

Jeffrey said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jeffrey said...

While weak narcotics such as Tramadol (Ultram) and Schedule IV opioid analgesics such as Darvon or Darvocet N 100 have a low risk for physical dependency and addiction with mild side effects such as dizziness, sedation, headache, nausea and constipation, Schedule III opioid analgesics such as Lortab, Tylenol #3, Vicodin and Vicoprofen have a low to moderate potential of physical or psychological dependence. Demerol, Dilaudid, Duragesic, Oxycontin and Percocet, which cannot be automatically refilled, fall under Schedule II because of their high abuse potential, and possible severe physical or psychological dependency.